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I am deeply financially committed to Canada. Victoria, actually. Very hard for me to leave. I have three sons, two are married. Four grandkids. But I am planning on how to make a quick getaway if need be. No one is vaxed. We will homeschool or private school, if we can find a non woke one. If that is possible. Two of my sons would leave easily. But my youngest with whom I own our main businesses doesn’t see a way yet. But he won’t allow his kids to be vaxed. If it comes to that, we all go. Trudeau is a monster. He is far more than just stupid. Freeland, who probably runs things is an actual Nazi. It amazes me people can’t see it.

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PS. We own a home in Nayarit. That would be our first bounce. From there though, not sure. The cartels control Mexico. I trust them though MORE than I trust the government of Canada! I am not exaggerating. Isn’t that amazing?

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Feb 25Liked by Kate Wand

I resonate with your story. My Bubba came to Canada from Russia as well, from a part of the country that is now the Ukraine. She spoke both Russian and Ukrainian, and also Polish because of the year she, her mother and siblings spent there waiting to join her father in Canada. They fled the pogroms against the Jews as her father was a prominent cantor which made them easy targets. I don't even pretend to be as strong and resilient as my ancestors, but what I do share with them is the ability to see the writing on the wall. As the scamdemic unfolded and "two weeks to flatten the curve" became months and years, I felt like a Jew in 1930s Germany who knew what was coming and started preparing.

My husband and I became permanent residents of Mexico last April and we're living here for the winter now. Please come to San Miguel de Allende and we'll show you around! There are some other Canadians here who are awake. But I digress... We are fortunate to be retired and living on a 60-acre property north of Toronto where we were able to live fairly freely during the scamdemic. Of course we were not permitted to travel, but at least I could host gatherings during lockdowns and nobody was the wiser. We're not ready to leave Canada permanently due to family and financial complications, but we own a home in Mexico now and have a right to be here permanently if the need arises. We'll probably spend close to half the year here going forward.

Mexico has been a breath of fresh air, though I have to say that too many locals are still wearing masks. Your son will be happy and healthy here! My kids (in their 20s) came to visit and the younger, who is semi-awake, said people seem happier here. She mentioned the children in particular and that was after being here for one day. Yes, we are not naive to the fact the globalist agenda is meant to be implemented everywhere, but at our age (60 and almost 60) we'll be happy if we can stave it off by living somewhere more sane and that will be way more difficult to convert. Cash is still king here and, with the number of Mexicans who are unbanked, all hell would break loose with any attempt to abolish cash (and, interestingly, the word for cash in Spanish is effectivo). There is music in the square most nights, with multi-generational families enjoying themselves together. The parades are to celebrate their culture, not the hatefests taking over the streets of Western cities. No statues are being taken down and no churches are being torched. When Canadians ask me if I feel safe in Mexico I laugh out loud. In Canada I'm one of those "yahoos" who wouldn't wear a mask and didn't get jabbed, plus I'm Jewish. Let's just say I feel much safer here than I would on a university campus.

So good on you for taking the leap and making a better life for yourselves and your precious son! If you go with the flow (there are some frustrations!), learn Spanish (easier for you than for us at our age, but we're committed), and commit to integrating you can have a wonderful life here. Mexicans are warm and loving people and they really do appreciate when new residents try speaking Spanish and respect them and their culture. I look forward to reading about your new life and I thank you for all you do -- I have given up on many in the health freedom movement I used to follow but you are one of the few exceptions who see the whole picture clearly.

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Thank you for your post! There are so many parallels in our lives… one of them being, we also lived on a large acreage in the country during the worst of lockdowns. We had to sell the shire, as my husband was formerly an airline pilot and lockdowns and mandates decimated his career. I also gave birth to my son there and I am forever grateful. We are not bitter; our lives have taken new paths and we are grateful for the changes we have been making.

I notice so many of the things you have about central Mexico. Pls email me so we can continue discussion more privately and meet in Mexico! Kate@very-opinionated.com

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Feb 26Liked by Kate Wand

I sent you an email from my Protonmail account!

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Thank you, I saw! Going to write back tonight :)

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Kate, thank you for sharing your story! My story on my Russian side is similar and full of holes too. From what I gather, my ancestors were fleeing during the Bolshevik revolution, took a last name off of a gravestone in Galicia in desperation not to be found, and ended up in the States. I pieced this together from stories, records, and DNA data I accrued when it was first possible, later wishing I hadn't - but familial matches were able to explain a great deal for me as far as knowing what went down, so overall, I feel like I was meant to have that information and I don't regret it.

This story is strangely backed up by the violent rage my father explains having witnessed when he came home from school one day and his grandfather was screaming at him, "How do you not know what a Bolshevik is?! What the hell are they teaching you at that school?!" My father was all of six when this happened.

From what I gather, they were so happy to leave, so traumatized by what happened, and so scared that, if found out, they might have to return someday - or those not born in the States would - that no one discussed it outright. They took family history secrets to the grave out of pure fear.

As much as I know had been whispered to me simply because I was the kid who would sit still and liked to hear all the stories - so I would ask and end up with more questions than I had when I started.

It's interesting. Your childhood inclinations were so similar to mine. I always wanted to go spelunking in the basement. I bet so many of us have similar experiences - our families were terrified and they were just trying to forget.

Thank you again for sharing your story! 🙏🏻💜💫

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Thank you so much for sharing your experience here too. The scene you describe with your great grandfather is one I can imagine well. I think there was lots of repressed feelings in those who experienced what they did— and came out in bursts of rage. I saw this too in my family. I have to watch it in myself. My grandfather was very chill and happy-go-lucky, almost childlike. Kind and funny. But when he got angry (a rare thing to see) it came out disproportionately and seemingly out of nowhere.

I also see that many of us with this shared kind of background, though the details are different, have an aversion to authoritarianism and are working out the intergenerational trauma.

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Thank you for having the conversation with me - it's great to meet someone to compare notes with on the topic! I think people who came from defection and refugee families were a lot faster to see the writing on the wall based on those generational experiences and stories, as were military/black ops/alphabet/gang/mafia/crime families and people who previously had been impacted adversely by the medical industrial complex. These groups are the canaries in the coal mine. When you know what you fled and why, your hackles go up out of a stringent desire to self-protect when you see it starting to happen all over again. People who didn't have these experiences are slower to connect the dots because they have less to compare it to. If it's something that didn't happen within their own monkeysphere, people are less likely to willingly employ that lens.

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You will be fine - you have your most treasured possessions with you - in your husband and son. The rest is transitory xx

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Feb 27Liked by Kate Wand

Kate, thank you for sharing your family history, your circumstances and your worries..it feels good to read your piece and everyone else’s replies in this feed: At least I am not alone in my fears, but it also feels awful as yet again these words only confirm my worries are not baseless and how precarious the situation is in the West.

My background is completely different to yours, but yet, the general family history so similar: constant moving and trying to get away from unpalatable regimes, in our case, against Jews. My parents moved to the UK as recently as the 70s thinking this was the place to live: Democratic and safe . .. my father who passed away 10 years ago would turn in his grave if he saw what his beloved UK has turned into. Where his children and grandchildren are looking for a new refuge.

Is there one? It is not a rhetorical question 😔

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Feb 25Liked by Kate Wand

'Perhaps when we leave our things, we leave a part of that story behind, and that is the tragedy and the beauty of our newfound freedom.'

Beautifully written. Life is full of paradox, of pain and of an alluring passage to happiness. All of which can be found in the simplicity and complexity of love and memory.

When leaving, take photos of special things and people left behind, hug and hold onto the knowledge wherever we are, there is an unknown path for each of us to travel. It not where you are going but how you travel in the face of uncertainty that matters to those travelling with you. Blessings, and thank you for sharing your heartfelt story Kate.

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Feb 25Liked by Kate Wand

I've been pondering this a lot myself. I think there's also a sense of a sort of connection to the land that your ancestors lived in for generations.

My family has been in Canada for over 200 years. I'm actually convinced it's longer than that, but the records end in Canada around that time. I recently finished a book about Canadian history (A History of Canada in Ten Maps by Adam Shoalts) which helped me to understand the people of Canada and their connection to the land (the wilderness, really).

I can only imagine what prompted your grandmother to get out of dodge, so to speak. It's going to be very difficult for myself, and many others, to uproot our entire history for somewhere new.

Trust God and He will provide, one way or another.

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What it's all about!

We're on a journey. Share a tale with those you meet along the way... Struggling to find out more. The humanity of it all, Thanks!

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It is so sad that history repeats. Humanity just can't seem to move forward because, I think, individuals refuse to resolve their past.

I hope you find and make yourself a better life Kate. Your leaving is definitely Canada's loss.

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Thank you Kate for sharing pieces of your family history, weaving it into your present story. My father fled communist Slovakia (Czechoslovakia at the time) for Canada at 17 for a better life. He tried to convince his parents, Holocaust survivors, and sister to come over but I think they were far too attached to their material things and certainties of their life to leave their homeland that betrayed them. There are so many holes in my father's history that I will never know because my grandparents dared not speak about the atrocities they and their parents experienced, including family trauma. We got bits and pieces over the years from my grandmother's siblings and my dad's cousins. Pieces of my heritage will always be a mystery.

Years later, as my parents prepare to flee Canada for good (and I've been away in Australia for almost 20 years) I'm starting to think that life in Slovakia could be an improvement compared to where Canada is heading. Sad irony.

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Thank you for sharing here Nathalie. I understand our kinship more now. It is sad, isn’t it? So it goes.

Czech Republic did not go crazy with lockdowns and all the rest. Is it the same as Slovakia or are they two nations now? Forgive my ignorance.

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Feb 25Liked by Kate Wand

“It may seem trivial, but when you really think about it, it is our attachment to our stuff that keeps us trapped in a place we wish to leave. Because in that stuff, we hold memories. Part of leaving our stuff behind is leaving an old world behind, an old life behind.”

This resonates deeply. I am attached to my Mama’s ‘stuff’, and knowing that one day I will have to move house, I will have to store some items and give up others. And that feels like physically removing her from my life.

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I applaud your bravery in pulling up roots to start anew. But I do wonder, with WHO's tyrannical coup to destroy every nation's sovereignty, if escape is ultimately possible.

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The UN SDGs are in theory worldwide, but only Westerners are dumb enough to implement it, and Canada is the most zealous of all in its implementation. There’s none of that garbage outside of the West.

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Okay, this is very good to know. I hadn't realized that.

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Yes Joanie, the popular culture of different nations, value of family and tradition are great barriers to nations going full great reset. Mexico has not been infected by the woke mind virus so far. Thanks for your comments!

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Right; family and tradition have been pretty much gutted here in Canada.

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Feb 26Liked by Kate Wand

You're young yet for these thoughts, comparing to when I realized I wanted to know about ancestry. I'm slow though, too many twists and turns in life have probably kept the interest far in the backgroung. Jews of Europe and Christians/Armenians of Turkey have abbreviated ancestries, tragically, I now realize the situation is approximate for other people from the East, such as your kin and some of commenters.

When I was your age, (I'm probably double yours, or more, 63) in America/Canada, the West in general, life wasn't sad, it was hopeful. Nothing terrible was going to happen, how could it. Challenges, personal or otherwise, yes, but nothing of the nightmares of the Middle East. I'm in disbelief, as we all are, at what's happened. As I'm preparing to fight our way back, somehow, I applaud your decision to seek happiness, your child deserves it, you deserve hopefulness.

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